300 YEARS OF FOSSIL-FUELED ADDICTION IN 5 MINUTES

A really great video from the Post Carbon Institute… a little history, and some humor. Some of the comments on the YouTube page come from rabid attack dogs, but that seems to be common for all YouTube videos these days.

Have a look at it here, or follow the link to the YouTube page.

Definitely a nice roll up of the information.

In Memoriam

Hello Everyone.

I know it seems odd that I’m typing this out, but every time I try to talk about it I begin to choke up and can’t speak.  So this will have to do.

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Yesterday my best buddy Chance moved on to a place I cannot follow, for now. He goes to rest and recover in the Summerland, where he’s young again, where bones don’t ache, where he can run like the wind and chase frisbees and sticks to his heart’s content and never get hurt, where there’s always good food and clean water, where the thunder isn’t scary, and it is warm if you want it, or snowing if you want it.  Chance loves to play in the snow.

Since he arrived in my life, Chance has taught me volumes about love, and patience, and balance.  He was always on the bounce, ready to go, no matter what had happened. He helped me understand how to get past the little things, how to be in the moment, and kept me from losing the last shreds of my sanity as the world has slowly been disintegrating.

Yesterday, I had to set him free from the trials of this world. The cancer we fought so hard that was in his front leg has reappeared, this time in his sacrum, eating away the bone, clamping down on the nerves to his entire back half.  While radiation treatments and hospitalization might buy us a week or two, it won’t last long. And his quality of life will greatly suffer from such treatment.

So I did my best to clear my schedule, went to the hospital to pick him up, and brought him home.  I made his favorite foods, hoping to picnic with him. He managed a liver treat. He didn’t really wake up except to drink like a camel and fall back asleep. Around 3 in the windy afternoon we went out to his favorite spot in the field.  We sat there, him under a blanket and as needed, a quilt, sheltering with a sheet between us and the Chinook winds.  He roused a little, and grabbed his frisbee, and watched the other dogs, and people.  We pretended to have one last tussle over the frisbee. Then he fell back asleep.

And at 4 in the afternoon, in the bright sun and the wind, Dr. Griffits came out to the field so we could help him travel to the Summerland.  And with his favorite toys with him, the feel of wind on his neck and face, the smell of warm spring grass in his nose, his family and friends surrounding him, he traveled to that kind place to rest for a while.

We all miss you terribly, big guy, but thank you so much for those 10 years.

I’ll see you there, in the Summerland, before you know it.

Chancelaps

CMH Winner Ed Freeman Has died.

Who is Ed Freeman?

You’re a 19-year-old kid. You’re critically wounded and dying in the jungle in the Ia Drang Valley , 11-14-1965, LZ X-ray, Vietnam . Your infantry unit is outnumbered 8-1 and the enemy fire is so intense, from 100 or 200 yards away, that your own Infantry Commander has ordered the MediVac helicopters to stop coming in.

You’re lying there, listening to the enemy machine guns, and you know you’re not getting out. Your family is half way around the world, 12,000 miles away and you’ll never see them again. As the world starts to fade in and out, you know this is the day.

Then, over the machine gun noise, you faintly hear that sound of a helicopter and you look up to see an unarmed Huey, but it doesn’t seem real because no Medi-Vac markings are on it.

Ed Freeman is coming for you. He’s not Medi-Vac, so it’s not his job, but he’s flying his Huey down into the machine gun fire, after the Medi-Vacs were ordered not to come.

He’s coming anyway.

And he drops it in and sits there in the machine gun fire as they load 2 or 3 of you on board.

Then he flies you up and out, through the gunfire to the doctors and nurses.

And he keeps coming back, 13 more times, and takes about 30 of you and your buddies out, who would never have gotten out.

Medal of Honor Recipient Ed Freeman died on 20th August 2008, at the age of 80, in Boise, ID. May God rest his soul.
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Ed Freeman – Recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor

I was just notified that Ed “Too Tall” Freeman had died this last summer (2008). While it’s way off subject from my usual posts, it seemed appropriate to let everyone know that another genuine hero has passed from this realm.

Requiscat in Pace Too Tall

CMH Winner Ed Freeman Has Died.

Who is Ed Freeman

You’re a 19-year-old kid. You’re critically wounded and dying in the jungle in the Ia Drang Valley , 11-14-1965, LZ X-ray, Vietnam . Your infantry unit is outnumbered 8-1 and the enemy fire is so intense, from 100 or 200 yards away, that your own Infantry Commander has ordered the MediVac helicopters to stop coming in.

You’re lying there, listening to the enemy machine guns, and you know you’re not getting out. Your family is half way around the world, 12,000 miles away and you’ll never see them again. As the world starts to fade in and out, you know this is the day.

Then, over the machine gun noise, you faintly hear that sound of a helicopter and you look up to see an unarmed Huey, but it doesn’t seem real because no Medi-Vac markings are on it.

Ed Freeman is coming for you. He’s not Medi-Vac, so it’s not his job, but he’s flying his Huey down into the machine gun fire, after the Medi-Vacs were ordered not to come.

He’s coming anyway.

And he drops it in and sits there in the machine gun fire as they load 2 or 3 of you on board.

Then he flies you up and out, through the gunfire to the doctors and nurses.

And he kept coming back, 13 more times, and took about 30 of you and your buddies out, who would never have gotten out.

Medal of Honor Recipient Ed Freeman died on 20th August 2008, at the age of 80, in Boise, ID. May God rest his soul.

Ed Freeman - CMH
Ed Freeman – Recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor

I was just notified that Ed “Too Tall” Freeman had died this last summer (2008). While it’s way off subject from my usual posts, it seemed appropriate to let everyone know that another genuine hero has passed from this realm.

Requiscat in Pace Too Tall

Posted via web from TweetingDonal’s Temporary Insanities